Seven of Iceland's stunning waterfalls

Seven of Iceland's stunning waterfalls

Iceland is unusually suited for waterfalls. This small island country has a north Atlantic climate that produces frequent rain and snow and a near-Arctic location that produces large glaciers, whose summer melts feed many rivers. As a result, it is home to a number of large and powerful waterfalls.

1. Dynjandi

Dynjandi

Dynjandi

The majestic Dynjandi - the Mountain Falls - is one of Iceland's most stunning waterfalls. Dynjandi is actually a series of waterfalls with a cumulative height of 100 meters. The uppermost falls are usually the most photographed because of their unusual trapezoidal shape, even though there are impressive, albeit smaller, waterfalls further down the river.

2. Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss

Seljalandsfoss is one of the best known waterfalls in Iceland. A narrow and tall fall, with a drop of 63 meters, it has the rare distinction that you can actually walk behind it, a spectacular photographic angle.

3. Gullfoss

Gullfoss

Gullfoss

Gullfoss - the Golden Falls - is one of Iceland's most popular attractions and an iconic waterfall offering a spectacular view of the forces and beauty of untouched nature. The water plummets down 32 meters in two stages into a rugged canyon which walls reach up to 70 meters in height. On a sunny day shimmering rainbow can be seen over the falls.

4. Háifoss

Háifoss

Háifoss

The Háifoss waterfall is situated near the Hekla volcano in southern Iceland. The river Fossá, a tributary of Þjórsá, drops here from a height of 122m. This is the third highest waterfall of the island.

5. Aldeyjarfoss

Aldeyjarfoss

Aldeyjarfoss

The Aldeyjarfoss waterfall is situated in the north of Iceland within the Highlands. One of the most interesting features of the waterfall is the contrast between the black basalt columns and the white waters of the fall. The river Skjálfandafljót drops here from a height of 20 m.

6. Dettifoss

Dettifoss

Dettifoss

Dettifoss - reputed to be the most powerful waterfall in Europe - is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland. The falls are 100 metres (330 ft) wide and have a drop of 45 metres (150 ft) down to the Jökulsárgljúfur canyon. It is the largest waterfall in Iceland in terms of volume discharge, having an average water flow of 193 m3/s.

7. Goðafoss

Goðafoss

Goðafoss

The Goðafoss - the "Waterfall of the Gods" in Icelandic - is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. It is located in the Bárðardalur district of North-Central Iceland at the beginning of the Sprengisandur highland road. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters. In the year 999 or 1000 the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion it is said that upon returning from the Alþingi, Þorgeir he threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall.