The Name "Earth" Comes From Anglo-Saxons

The Name "Earth" Comes From Anglo-Saxons

Nearly every language has its own name for our home planet. It's called "Terra" in Portuguese, "Dünya" in Turkish or "Aarde" in Dutch, just to name a few. However, common to all languages is that the names were derived from the same meaning in their origins - "ground" or "soil".

Every other planet in the Solar System is named after a Greek or Roman God, except for our planet. The word "Earth" comes from the Anglo-Saxon word "Erda" and is thought to be at least 1,000 years old. Ironically, the planet is covered by 71% water - the only planet we know of to have this precious fluid in liquid form.

Translations of the Bible into English was one of the earliest recorded use of the name Earth - "God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good." (Genesis 1:10)